On the morning of this observation I had traveled to Lake Lewisville in order to photograph the Louisiana Whooping Cranes that were there. When I arrived I discovered that the large white birds were not in the place I expected them to be. The cranes had recently begun to wander away from their normal haunts, and on this day they were spending time at another part of the lake.

I decided this was a perfect opportunity to explore a bit and maybe investigate some of the places I had observed the cranes foraging. The whoopers frequently spent time in the same set of locations on the floodplain, and it would be interesting to see what made these places so appealing to the birds.

So I headed out onto the field. After our long, extended drought my expectations were that I would find the floodplain virtually devoid of any water. But as I made my way out into the field I instead encountered a deep, wide, and fast flowing creek. This was an obstacle I was ill equipped to get past, so I turned and headed upstream on the off chance the creek would narrow a little further from the lake. It did not.

The creek was an unwelcome but beautiful impediment.
The creek was an unwelcome but beautiful impediment.

Coyote - Pups!

I walked along the bank for over a half mile (one kilometer) as it twisted and turned across the property. It soon became apparent that I wasn’t going to find away across without traveling much, much further, and I decided to head back the way I had come.

That’s when I saw these little guys. Coyote pups! There were three in all. I must have just missed mom, and the youngsters soon followed her into the tall grass. It was fortunate that I turned back when I did!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!

Coyote - Pups!