NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

I stopped by Lake Ray Hubbard yesterday to check on the Whooping Cranes, and I was delighted to find that they were still there. That makes for a total of at least eleven days at this location.

The cranes were up to their usual habits on this day—namely they were busying themselves with foraging up and down the east bank of this part of Lake Ray Hubbard. They roamed a little further and wider than I have seen them do on past visit, but hey, this pair clearly has the wanderlust!

Their travels this afternoon created several interesting juxtapositions. A couple of times the cranes passed by examples of some of our other species of large white waterfowl, allowing for a quick visual comparison. Other times they would pass by places where the rooftops of houses from a nearby subdivision could be seen through the trees. Rowlett Creek runs between the neighborhood and the lake, so the cranes are still quite isolated in this spot despite the proximity of the houses.

Here the Whooping Cranes (indicated  with the arrow) pass by a group of American White Pelicans near the shore and a Great Egret in the foreground.
Here the Whooping Cranes (indicated with the arrow) pass by a group of American White Pelicans near the shore and a Great Egret in the foreground.
Here the cranes pass by the rooftops of houses in a nearby neighborhood.  Hints of the cranes colorful leg bands can be seen in the circular inset.
Here the cranes pass by the rooftops of houses in a nearby neighborhood. Hints of the crane’s colorful leg bands can be seen in the circular inset.
This picture gives some context.  The cranes are under the tree indicated with the red arrow.
This picture gives some context. The cranes are under the tree indicated with the red arrow.
A group of American White Pelicans flies by the Whooping Cranes as they forage along the shore.
A group of American White Pelicans flies by the Whooping Cranes as they forage along the shore.
A closer look at the previous picture.
A closer look at the previous picture.
After wandering several hundred yards/meters to the south, the cranes returned to their preferred spot near the north end of the lake just as the sun was beginning to set.
After wandering several hundred yards/meters to the south, the cranes returned to their preferred spot near the north end of the lake just as the sun was beginning to set.
The cranes passing by the same group of pelicans again—this time headed in the opposite direction.
The cranes passing by the same group of pelicans once again—this time headed in the opposite direction.

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]