NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

This is the first time since early in February that there has not been an adult eagle sitting on the nest when I arrived. The warm weather allowed mom eagle to take a break from brooding. Ever protective, she still kept close watch on the nest and eaglets from just a short distance away.

The adults eagles were off the nest on this warm day.
The adult eagles were off the nest on this warm day.

Only one eaglet was seen on this day, and he only made a brief appearance before ducking back below the rim of the nest.

One eaglet makes a brief appearance.
One eaglet makes a brief appearance.

Soon the male arrived on site. Its easy to tell when he is in the area because when the female spots him flying by, she keeps her eye on him and watches him until he lands. The pair call to each other frequently at these times. If I listen carefully, I can sometimes hear their vocalization even at this great distance.

Looking right.
Looking right.
Looking left.
Looking left.
Calling out to her mate.
Calling out to her mate.
The male eagle perched atop the tower.
The male eagle perched atop the tower.
The pair together.
The pair together.
When the late afternoon sun hits the nest just right I can manage a decent photograph even from several hundred yards/meters away.
When the late afternoon sun hits the nest just right I can manage a decent photograph even from several hundred yards/meters away.
A closer look.
A closer look.
A suggestion of the actual distance.
A suggestion of the actual distance.

After the male settled in, the female took to the air and landed in a tree closer to the water’s edge presumably to fish for more food for her growing eaglets.

The Bald Eagle is the tiny dark dot in this picture.
The Bald Eagle is the tiny dark dot in this picture.

Interestingly, there is a Red-tailed hawk perched on the transmission tower in the foreground of this picture. This hawk is likely associated with the active Red-tailed Hawk nest which sits in the shadow of the Bald Eagle’s nest. See: Red-tailed Hawk – Juxtaposed

Bald Eagle on the right and Red-tailed Hawk on the left.
Bald Eagle on the right and Red-tailed Hawk on the left.
An active Red-tailed Hawk sits in the shadow of the Bald Eagle nest.
An active Red-tailed Hawk sits in the shadow of the Bald Eagle nest.
A female Red-tailed Hawk incubating her eggs.
A female Red-tailed Hawk incubating her eggs.

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]