Sep 302014
 

Dateline – September 21, 2014

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

Josey at seven months of age.

Josey at seven months of age.

We stopped by to check in on little Josey again just a over a week ago. Josey has been under the care of the good folks at the Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch (WCCR) since she was found orphaned way back in April of 2014. I am happy to report that she is doing just fine!

Josey has recently been moved to an outdoor enclosure which allows her fresh air and plenty of room to play and exercise. She shares this space with two other Bobcats—a rambunctious young kitten named Crystal, and an older cat named Saturday.

Josey dozing in her new enclosure.

Josey dozing in her new enclosure.

She seemed very relaxed on this warm afternoon.

She seemed very relaxed on this warm afternoon.

As long as we kept our distance, Josey did not mind our presence.

As long as we kept our distance, Josey did not mind us being in the enclosure with her.

Crystal

Crystal

Saturday

Saturday

Across the way from these three is another adult Bobcat named Hoover. His fur has a more reddish tint than that of the others.

It is interesting to note from these photographs that every Bobcat has a different appearance. Some Bobcats have vividly spotted coats, while others sport an almost uniform tawny color. Overall coloration can range from gray to tan to red. Bobcats also have unique facial features just like people do—if you spend enough time around these animals it is not difficult to tell them apart.

Hoover

Hoover

Baby season is almost over for the year and things have slowed down a bit at the Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch as a result. Many of the orphaned and injured animals that had been receiving care over the summer have now been released back into the wild. The foxes, raccoons, and skunks have all been reintroduced.

A few stragglers remain, however, with Porcia the Porcupine being the most prominent. I’ve told Porcia’s remarkable story in one of the earlier posts in this series. If you haven’t read it yet, it would be worth your while to go back and check it out now.

Porcia the porcupine.

Porcia the porcupine.

A portrait of Porcia

A portrait of Porcia

Exploring her enclosure.

Exploring her enclosure.

Porcia’s rehabilitation is complete, and she will be returned to the wild soon. I believe the intention is to release Porcia in the Texas Hill Country at the very first opportunity to do so.

Tempting Porcia with a nectarine.

Tempting Porcia with a nectarine.

Porcia falls for it!

Porcia falls for it!

Porcia loves nectarines!

This Porcupine loves nectarines!

Right next door to Porcia’s enclosure is a large aquarium holding a Common Snapping Turtle, also under the care of the rehabbers at the WCCR. For those of you who have been following the story of the Mute Swan cygnets at Josey Ranch Lake in Carrollton—the picture below provides a nice look at the kind of turtle that has taken so many young waterfowl at that park.

These aquatic turtles sneak up under unsuspecting ducklings and drag them beneath the water’s surface before they even know what hit them. At least one—and possibly two—young swans were lost to Common Snapping Turtles this summer at Josey Ranch Lake. But we bear no grudges, this is only what snapping turtles do.

Common Snapping Turtle.

Common Snapping Turtle.

Inside the clinic we met some of the new arrivals at the center. Devon and Ella were rescued from a pile of timber that had been set ablaze. The two young Bobcats suffered severe burns on multiple parts of their bodies, but they have recovered nicely and their prognosis is good. In just a few weeks their wounds have largely healed, leaving the folks at the WCCR with two rowdy and playful kittens to deal with.

Devon, one of the two kittens rescued from a burn pile.

Devon, one of the two kittens rescued from a burn pile.

Devon gives a snappy salute!

Devon gives a snappy salute!

What a face!

What a face!

These little guys thrive on attention.

These little guys thrive on attention.

Many of you might also remember Toby from our last Josey update. This unusual and lively kitten is also doing well and is growing fast.

Toby appears to be slightly different from the other young Bobcats at the Wildlife Center. His fur is lighter in color and is much more fluffy than that of the other kittens at the facility. One thing Toby does have in common with those other young cats, however, is his love for raucous play. We did our best to wear him out!

Toby the extra fluffy Bobcat kitten.

Toby the extra fluffy Bobcat kitten.

Toby takes a break from play time.

Toby takes a break from play time.

Josey has about another five to six months at the center before she will be ready for release. We are looking forward to that day and plan to be there to record the big event in pictures when it happens!

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

  2 Responses to “Josey The Orphaned Bobcat Kitten – Update Four”

  1. great update! Love the salute by Devon lol! Great pics and story! 🙂 Thank you for sharing

  2. Great pictures! Thanks for keeping up with these guys….

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