Aug 082016
 
Carrollton Cooper's Hawks

In North Texas when a developer decides to put in a new subdivision it is usually the bulldozers that lead the way. In my neighborhood, though, there is one small portion of property that was spared the usual onslaught. A one acre park still retaining its original woods. Mature hackberry and pecan trees crowd this

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Mar 202016
 
The Elm Fork of the Trinity River - Surging through Lewisville

We are still dealing with the side effects of last spring’s heavy rain and flooding. Until just recently the spillway at Lewisville Lake has been wide open and the Elm Fork of the Trinity River has been full and flowing faster than it has in years. It’s quite a sight to see. The Trinity in

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Feb 122015
 
Coyote - A Brief Encounter

February 9, 2015 – Carrollton, Texas We observed this stalwart Coyote a few days ago during our morning commute. The Coyote was crossing a large open field, and was making his way almost directly toward us and the heavily trafficked road we were stopped on. Thoroughfares and fast moving automobiles are some of most daunting

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May 092014
 
Great-tailed Grackle - Soggy Bread

These opportunistic Great-tailed Grackles were observed as they helped themselves to some soggy pieces of bread left behind by duck feeding park patrons. In the pictures below the big black male grackles are contrasted nicely with the smaller, duller colored females. On occasion, the males would take time off from eating strike poses that were

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May 082014
 
Mallard - Odd Couple

This interesting odd couple are very dedicated to each other. This is a male wild Mallard and his friend, the distantly related domestic duck, known as an American Pekin. I have been visiting this pond for several weeks now, and these two ducks are always together. Strangely, the domestic duck also appears to be a

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May 062014
 
Nutria - A Little Bit Different

Nutrias and Beavers can look superficially similar when they are observed swimming through the water. Because of this it can sometimes be hard to tell the two rodents apart at first glance. One of the first things I look for when trying to differentiate these rodents is the color of their snouts. Nutrias typically have

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Apr 112014
 
Mallard - Intersex

This is a photograph of an intersex Mallard. In this case, we have a female duck which is also displaying some secondary gender traits of a male Mallard—most notably in its plumage coloration. This unusual condition occurs for a couple of possible reasons. One might be that the duck has the gonadal tissue of both

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