Oct 062014
 
A Summer of Swainson's Hawks

It has been a good summer for Swainson’s Hawks. What I mean by that is that I have had the opportunity to observe many more of them this year than I have in the past. Until this summer, every time I have observed Swainson’s Hawks they have been on the wing and high in the

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Jun 252014
 
Urban Wildlife Roundup - North and South

Dateline – June 20, 2014 Today’s urban wildlife roundup will take us to the far extremes of the metroplex—both north and south. The first set of photographs were taken around Lewisville Lake in Denton County over the course of several days. The next section contains a collection of pictures recorded just last weekend in south

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May 092014
 
Great-tailed Grackle - Soggy Bread

These opportunistic Great-tailed Grackles were observed as they helped themselves to some soggy pieces of bread left behind by duck feeding park patrons. In the pictures below the big black male grackles are contrasted nicely with the smaller, duller colored females. On occasion, the males would take time off from eating strike poses that were

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May 082014
 
Mallard - Odd Couple

This interesting odd couple are very dedicated to each other. This is a male wild Mallard and his friend, the distantly related domestic duck, known as an American Pekin. I have been visiting this pond for several weeks now, and these two ducks are always together. Strangely, the domestic duck also appears to be a

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May 062014
 
Nutria - A Little Bit Different

Nutrias and Beavers can look superficially similar when they are observed swimming through the water. Because of this it can sometimes be hard to tell the two rodents apart at first glance. One of the first things I look for when trying to differentiate these rodents is the color of their snouts. Nutrias typically have

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May 022014
 
Carolina Chickadee - Little Bird

These little busybodies are hard to pin down. They flitter from branch to branch so quickly that it is difficult to get the camera on them in time for a clear shot—especially at close range. This Carolina Chickadee was close enough—maybe even a little too close, as the camera angle is from a little further

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