Jul 242014
 

Dateline – July 20, 2014

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

Josey, the Orphaned Bobcat kitten found in Carrollton earlier this spring, has been under the care of expert wildlife rehabilitators for a little over three months now. A month had passed since we last checked in on Josey, and it was time to pay her another visit, so we loaded up and headed out east to the Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch (WCCR).

Josey at nearly six months of age.

Josey at nearly six months of age.

Soon after arriving we checked on Josey and found that she is doing just fine. Josey is approaching six months of age, which means she has about another six months to go at the rehab center. She still remains wary of of people, which is exactly what we want to see in a cat that is a candidate for eventual release back into the wild. She will need a healthy fear of humans in order to stay safe once she is set free.

She is healthy and strong.

She is healthy and strong.

It has been a very busy baby season at the Wildlife Center at Cross Timbers Ranch. Many orphaned baby Bobcats have come in this summer, and Josey now has plenty of company. In the coming days Josey will be moved into a much larger outdoor enclosure which she will share with several other Bobcats. This will be an major step in her rehabilitation and is of critical importance.

Some of you may ask, why rehab wild Bobcats? A piece of the answer can be found in the photographs below. Bobcats are very special animals. They are highly intelligent and are capable of sophisticated interactions and shows of affection. You can see the pixie like engagement in the eyes of this kitten—full of mischief. This bobcat has been named Toby.

Toby, the imprinted Bobcat kitten.

Toby, the imprinted Bobcat kitten.

This little kitten came into the center recenttly, already imprinted on humans after being cared for over the course of a few weeks by the well-meaning person who found him. Unfortunately, that means Toby will most likely not be releasable back into the wild, but instead will be come a permanent resident of the center—possibly as an education animal.

Toby is full of mischief.

Toby is full of mischief.

Though not the preferred outcome, this situation does allow for closer and more hands on interaction with the kitten. Deep bond can form in these cases.

His face is very expressive.

His face is very expressive.

While at the center we also took a few minutes to visit with a few of our other animal friends under the care of the good folks at the WCCR. We were particularly interested in the recently acquired Gray Fox kits. And, of course, clowning juvenile Raccoons are always a delight to see!

A young Gray Fox.

A young Gray Fox.

There's no way around it, these little guys are clowns.

There’s no way around it, these little guys are clowns.

Juvenile Raccoons love to play.

Juvenile Raccoons love to play.

Sometimes they will try to sneak a kiss.

Sometimes they will try to sneak a kiss.

Come back!

Come back!

Saying our goodbyes.

Saying our goodbyes.

On the way home we had a strange encounter just outside the town of Quilan, Texas. Take a look at the pictures below.

An alien invasion!?!

An alien invasion!?!

How shocking is it to see a UFO parked in the grass next to a rural state highway? Answer: Very!

The most important question is whether the aliens are friends or foes. From the looks of things, the flying saucer has been given a fresh coat of paint. That must mean at the very least they want to make a good impression!

The Quinlan flying saucer.

The Quinlan flying saucer.

Back at home, a quick Google searched revealed this structure to be something known as a “Futuro”—A prefabricated house that was first developed in the late 1960’s and early 1970s. It is said that fewer than 100 were ever built. Click here to see what Wikipedia has to say about the Futuro.

Not surprisingly there is even a website dedicated to remembering the Futuro and recording information about the few remaining examples. That website can be found here: The Futuro House.

Click here for an article on the Quinlan Futuro itself.

So, just an odd house, and not a flying saucer after all! Unfortunately, things might not be quite that simple. Digging a little deeper, I came across this slightly disturbing account of UFO and alien activity in the Quinlan area: UFO Hunters – Shocking Encounter in Quinlan, Texas

Keep your eyes on the skies. The truth is out there!

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

  4 Responses to “Josey the Orphaned Bobcat Kitten – Update Three”

  1. Great write up and pictures! Josey’s story is incredibly heart warming

  2. Although I live in Tulsa, I am making a special effort to follow this story; and I’m so grateful to the columnisst and DFW Urban Wildlife for their follow-through with this one little animal! Love Sonia’s contributions, as well! She is a major worker at the Wildlife Center@CrosstimbersRanch! Her creativity is priceless!! (And, I’ve always wondered about that strange saucer-shaped structure, which was in one spot, and then just disappeared!!! Now, it has reappeared, and thanks to Sonia’s contribution, we now know where it has “landed”, once again!!

    • There’s no doubt, Sonia is an angel of mercy. She is a dedicated and hard worker. This kind of work requires a special kind of person. They are very lucky to have her at the WCCR!

  3. I particularly liked seeing the photos of “Toby” & Sonia in this weeks edition of the ongoing story!! It should be noted that I have NEVER SEEN a grey fox in the wild! So that photo was a first for me!! thank you, DFW-Urban Wildlife and Crosstimbers Ranch!! You are all appreciated!

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