These photographs were taken by Trail Camera on a dried pond bed near Lewisville Lake. The pictures show Coyotes and Armadillos together but do not show them acting as predator and prey.

Armadillos were drawn to this pond bed because of the soft soil and easy digging it provided.  This guy was one of the first to show up.
Armadillos were drawn to this pond bed because of the soft soil and easy digging it provided. This guy was one of the first to show up.
He was soon followed by several more.  In some pictures there were as many as five Armadillos in front of the camera at one time.
He was soon followed by several more. In some pictures there were as many as five Armadillos in front of the camera at one time.
It was long afterwards that a pack of Coyotes showed up.
It was not long afterwards that a pack of Coyotes showed up.
On several occasions the camera recorded multiple Coyotes patrolling the pond bed.
On several occasions the camera recorded multiple Coyotes patrolling the pond bed.
Sometimes the Coyotes and Armadillos gathered together in front of the camera.  There are four Armadillos and one Coyote in this picture.
Sometimes the Coyotes and Armadillos gathered together in front of the camera. There are four Armadillos and one Coyote in this picture.
No instances of the Coyotes harassing the Armadillos were recorded.
No instances of the Coyotes harassing the Armadillos were recorded.
...But, this Armadillo does appear to have a large scar  on the rump end of his shell.  We can only speculate about the cause.
…But, this Armadillo does appear to have a large scar on the rump end of his shell. We can only speculate about the cause.

Wikipedia has this to say about Coyotes:

The coyote (US /kaɪˈoʊtiː/ or /ˈkaɪ.oʊt/, UK /kɔɪˈjoʊteɪ/, or /kɔɪˈjoʊt/; Canis latrans), also known as the American jackal, brush wolf, or the prairie wolf, is a species of canine found throughout North and Central America, ranging from Panama in the south, north through Mexico, the United States, and Canada. It occurs as far north as Alaska and all but the northernmost portions of Canada. The term is also used for the eastern coyote (Canis latrans var.), which contains not only C. latrans but also significant percentages of Canis lupus lycaon ancestry.