NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

Sunday May 19, 2013 marked the end of three full weeks for the Whooping Cranes at Lake Ray Hubbard in Rowlett, Texas. The cranes were engaged in their usual activity of foraging in the short vegetation on the east shore of the lake. The pair is very dedicated to one another, and they always stay close together. On this visit the cranes restricted their foraging to a relatively small area.

I have been asked to remind everyone that in Texas the legal guidelines stipulate that a 2000 foot (610 meters) distance be maintained between the cranes and observers. There are a couple of very nice viewing areas in Wynn Joyce Park on the west side of the lake that allow viewers to honor these guidlines. Binoculars or spotting scopes will be necessary. These spots are accessible by foot after parking in nearby neighborhoods. No closer approach should be attempted. Right now the cranes are in a very secure position. They are protected to the east by Rowlett Creek and from the west by Lake Lavon. Flushing or disturbing the cranes in any way should be avoided.

Last week’s rains refilled this part of the lake to a large degree. This adds to the security of the cranes but it will not last long once the summer heat sets in.

Good atmospherics allowed for better than normal viewing on this day.
Good atmospherics allowed for better than normal viewing on this day.
The cranes are very dedicated to one another.
The cranes are very dedicated to one another.
The cranes never stray too far from each other.
They never stray too far from each other’s side.
Recent rains have refilled the lake here to a large degree.
Recent rains have refilled the lake here to a large degree.
American White Pelicans congregate on the small islands near the north end of the lake.
American White Pelicans congregate on the small islands near the north end of the lake.
This Transmission Tower marks my favorite viewing location.
This transmission tower marks my favorite viewing location.

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]