Mar 062013
 

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

There was a changing of the guard at the eagle nest this weekend while I watched.

When I arrived on this late afternoon, one of the eagles was on the nest engaged in incubation duties. The other eagle was perched on the arm of an adjacent transmission tower keeping watch.

Incubating the eggs.

Incubating the eggs.

Keeping watch.

Keeping watch.

The eagle through a crosshatch of steel.

The eagle through a crosshatch of steel.

The nest from roughly the same angle.

The nest from roughly the same angle.

The two tower in context.  The nest is on the right, and the perched eagle is on the left.

The two tower in context. The nest is on the right, and the perched eagle is on the left.

After some time, the eagle on the tower flew over to the nest, and the two big birds traded places. They were effectively taking turns with the egg incubation duties.

The two eagles together.

The two eagles together.

Cautiously approaching the nest.

Cautiously approaching the nest.

Preparing to trad places.

Preparing to trad places.

Dropping down into the nest.

Dropping down into the nest.

Trading places.

Trading places.

The newly relieved eagle wasted no time flying to the top of the tower where she began stretching her wings a preening—behaviors clearly demonstrating her appreciation for getting a brief respite from the tedium of nest sitting.

Preparing to leave.

Prepearing to leave.

Flying away.

Flying away.

Leaving the scene.

Leaving the scene.

Arriving at the top of the tower.

Arriving at the top of the tower.

Glad to have a little break.

Glad to have a little break.

Sharing the incubation duties.

Sharing the incubation duties.

NOTE: To date I have been referring to the incubating eagle as the female, and the roaming bird as the male. Though, this is clearly not always the case, it is a convention I will probably continue with unless I discover someway to clearly differentiate the gender of the two adult birds.

NOTE: This post is part of a continuing series of observations: [ First | << Prev | Next >> ]

  2 Responses to “Bald Eagle – Nest Tower Update 4”

  1. Thanks for your great documentation of these beautiful animals. Could you give us the location so I could go and observe them myself too? I would greatly appreciate it. I see you have the map there but don’t know how to figure out where the two towers are exactly. Thanks — S.

    • Your best bet for viewing the Eagles is to visit the John Bunker Sands Wetland Center. They are open to the public on the first and third weekend of every month and can direct you to a great place to observe the eagles.

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